Media Releases

Since the first ECSS consensus statement on Overtraining (Meeusen et al. 2006) there has remained a “lack of common and consistent terminology as well as a gold standard for the diagnosis of overtraining syndrome”. Thus the authors decided to work on an update, taking into consideration the increase in literature on this topic. Presenting state of the art knowledge the current consensus statement: „Prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the overtraining syndrome: Joint consensus statement of the European College of Sport Science (ECSS) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)” will be published in the European Journal of Sport Sciences (EJSS) as well as in the Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (MSSE).

The full article is now published online ahead of print as an iFirst article:

Prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the overtraining syndrome: Joint consensus statement of the European College of Sport Science (ECSS) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

DOI: 10.1080/17461391.2012.730061

 

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Gifu is a large city located in centre of Japan. European flights usually land in Narita, an airport about an hour away from Tokyo, therefore to get to Gifu (400 km south) you can take an internal flight to Centrair (the airport of central Japan) or take a comfortable train journey on ‘Shinkansen’ the Japanese fast train... and enjoy the Japanese landscape! It was the first time for us in Japan and we definitely felt a world away from Europe!

The Congress venue in Gifu-shi

On arrival in Gifu we met Professor Toshihto Katsumura at the hotel and enjoyed some Japanese food with the conference organisers. The food was very much welcomed after the long journey and gave us our first taste of Japanese cuisine. The first day of the congress we took the accredit and uploaded our presentations (it was amazing that a bar code scanner logged us in and saved the presentation straight into the right folder, this is Japanese style!).

After have taking a look at the posters we took a trip into downtown Gifu, walking across streets to find many temples and holy fountains. For a better view of the city we visited the Gifu City Tower where you could take in a panoramic view of the city from the Towers 43rd floor. We noticed that Gifu was very different from many European cities, sprawling for miles as houses never exceeded 4 stories.

In the afternoon after getting caught in heavy downpour of rain we came back to the hotel, to get ready for dinner with Professor Katsumura, his colleagues and his past and present students. The restaurant reflected the culture of Japan and was a great restaurant for us to visit. The room was filled with long low tables and you were required to take off your shoes before sitting on cushions to eat. We tried a lot of different Japanese food, sashimi (raw fish which included Jellyfish!), fish eggs, eel and green tea ice cream! Chopsticks were not a requirement, however getting into the Japanese spirit we both managed to eat our whole meal with chopsticks! We also tasted Japanese drinks: beer, cocktails and also Sake (Japanese wine), all very good! We left everyone after dinner whilst they continued on to a Kareoke bar in preparation for our presentations (and some hiking!) the following day.

Enjoying some Japanese cuisine

Mount Kinka is not like the Alps, but at 30°c, 80% humidity and a slope of 15% it certainly feels like it, despite being in Gifu!  We hiked to the top of Mount Kinka on the morning of our second day in Gifu. At the top of the mountain is Gifu Castle, the most ancient building of the city (1200 AC) and certainly a standout feature of the city of Gifu.

View from the top of Mount Kinka at Gifu Castle

In the afternoon of our second day the time finally arrived for the international session at the conference and our presentations. During the session there were 3 Japanese speakers and ourselves. Everyone was very friendly, interested and welcoming, asking us about our time in Japan and recommending more places for us to visit! The topics presented were all very interesting and Professor Miyashita began the session with a very funny and interesting presentation about the impact of shivering on fat metabolism in extremely cold conditions. Our presentations were last in the session, we did our best and the audience appreciated both our topics... although the biomechanics we think was a little complicated for people on a Saturday afternoon!  During the successive poster session we had time to speak to the Chairman of the conference and also to speak to other students about their posters and our own work.

On our final evening we went for dinner in a smaller Japanese style cafe and tried some different food (we ate a lot during the trip!). We were on our own without the help of our Japanese friends so we chose what to eat by looking at the pictures on the menu! On the third day Sally flew back to England, whereas Gaspare and Professor Katsumura travelled back to Tokyo. Tokyo is very different from Gifu, the city has a lot of tourist places, most of the directions and signs are also in English, and each district shows something different and characteristic, from the electronics bazar of Akihabara to the skyscraper of Shiodome. Next year the JSPFSM congress will be in Tokyo and for sure will be a nice and exciting trip for the 2013 ECSS YIA winners!

We really would like to thanks ECSS for the fantastic opportunity to present and visit Japan. We would also like to thank the JSPFSM conference for hosting and making us feel very welcome in a very foreign country, and especially Professor Toshihito Katsumura for his kindly welcome and willingness: for letting us live and taste the real Japanese atmosphere. Sally Fenton, Gaspare Pavei

For further information, please do not hesitate to contact us. Also please have your published work sent to us, enabling us to link your work to our section ECSS in the media.

Steffen Neubert
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ECSS 2016 and ECSS 2017 congress bids now decided

Following 6 bids from 5 countries inside Europe the ECSS Executive Board has decided to hold the 21st and the 22nd annual congress of the European College of Sport Science in the cities of Vienna, Austria (2016) and Bochum, Germany (2017).

 

ECSS Vienna 2016 - 21st annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science

Hosted by the Centre for Sport Science and University Sports, University of Vienna

Venue: Austria Center Vienna (ACV)

Dates: 6th to 9th of July 2016

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Web: www.ecss-congress.eu/2016

The hosting institution, University of Vienna, was founded by Duke Rudolph IV in 1365, is the oldest university in the German‐speaking world and one of the largest in Central Europe.

Vienna has established an outstanding reputation as conference city. For 6 years in a row, Vienna has been the number 1 destination worldwide for association meetings (Source: Internationals Congress & Convention Association statistics 2005-2010). Vienna provides all the infrastructure and professionalism required to successfully organize the 21st Annual ECSS Congress of the European College of Sport Science.

See you in Vienna in 2016.


ECSS MetropolisRuhr 2017 - Sport Science in a Metropolitan Area

22nd annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science

Hosted by the University Alliance Metropolis Ruhr: Ruhr University Bochum, Technical University Dortmund, University Duisburg-Essen

Venue: Campus Ruhr University Bochum

Dates: 5th to 8th of July 2017

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Web: www.ecss-congress.eu/2017

The neighbouring universities of Bochum, Dortmund, and Duisburg-Essen established the University Alliance Metropolis Ruhr to create a university network of 89,000 students, 1250 professors, and a unique diversity of disciplines. The aim of the alliance is to promote the strengths of the individual universities and pursue common research and teaching programmes with the objective of establishing the Ruhr as a region of higher education excellence.

The Metropolis Ruhr is situated in the west of Germany in the Federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Throughout the region there live about 5.7 million people in 11 cities and 42 smaller municipalities. When most people think about the Metropolis Ruhr, they think about heavy industry and coal. In recent years the region has undergone a major transformation and is changed from a grey industrial area into a modern and trendy culture metropolis perfectly prepared to host the annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science.

See you in Bochum.


About the congress

The annual congresses of the European College of Sport Science have been organized since the inauguration of the ECSS in 1995. Today the ECSS congresses rank among the leading sport scientific congresses worldwide. The congress comprises a range of invited lecturers, multi- and mono-disciplinary symposia as well as tutorial lecturers and Socratic debates. The ECSS congress is attended by international sport scientists with an academic career. The ECSS congress welcomes more than 2.000 participants from all over the world.


Future bidders

The next open congresses to hand in a bidding for are ECSS 2018 and ECSS 2019, respectively. The deadline for application is the 1st of April 2014. For more details please visit our congress bidding page.

 


For further information and high resolution images, please do not hesitate to contact us. Also please have your published work sent to us, enabling us to link your work to our section ECSS in the media.

Steffen Neubert
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Research first presented in Liverpool at the 2011 ECSS YIA-competition may change exercise recommendations


Today it is 2 years ago that Sam Shepherd and Matthew Cocks were working on their abstracts for the 16th  annual Congress of the ECSS in Liverpool, UK. Both abstracts were accepted for oral presentations in the Young Investigator Award competition and did very well. Matthew Cocks won the 2nd price and Sam Shepherd received a special recommendation of the jury in the plenary YIA session as the quality of his research was judged to be equal. However, as the data were generated in one very large study, Sam was the unlucky one to be excluded from the final part of the YIA competition. The supervisor of these former PhD students is Professor Anton Wagenmakers, the Chair of the Scientific Board of ECSS. Today the research of Sam and Matt will be published in the Journal of Physiology and is regarded to be of such importance that the Physiological Society and Liverpool John Moores University today are also distributing the following Press Release.

Inactive people can achieve major health and fitness gains in a fraction of the time

With many of us struggling to get enough exercise, sport and exercise scientists at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) and the University of Birmingham, under the lead of Professor Anton Wagenmakers, have been working on a time-saving solution.

Instead of long stints in the gym and miles of running in the cold, the same results could be achieved in less than a third of the time, according to new research published today (1 February) in The Journal of Physiology.

The current recommendation of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and UK Department of Health is that people of all ages should do three to five hours of endurance training per week to increase health and fitness and prevent chronic diseases and premature mortality. However, most people find it difficult to set aside this much time in their busy lives.

This study has taken existing research to a new level to prove that replacing endurance training with two types of interval training, High intensity Interval Training (HIT) and Sprint Interval Training (SIT), can make a massive difference to our health and aerobic fitness.  In two articles in the 1 February issue of The Journal of Physiology, the researchers describe their recent discoveries that three sessions of SIT, taking just 90 min per week, are as effective as five sessions of traditional endurance exercise, taking five hours per week, in increasing whole body insulin sensitivity via two independent mechanisms.

LJMU researcher Matthew Cocks explains: 'One mechanism involves improved delivery of insulin and glucose to the skeletal muscle and the other involves improved burning of the fat stored in skeletal muscle fibres.  Additionally, we found a reduced stiffness of large arteries which is important in reducing the risk of vascular disease.'

On the basis of these novel and earlier findings from other laboratories, Professor Wagenmakers expects that HIT and SIT will turn out to be unique alternative exercise modes suitable to prevent blood vessel disease, hypertension, diabetes and most of the other ageing and obesity related chronic diseases.

LJMU researcher Sam Shepherd describes: 'SIT involves four to six repeated 30 second 'all out' sprints on special laboratory bikes interspersed with 4.5 minutes of very low intensity cycling. Due to the very high workload of the sprints, this method is more suitable for young and healthy individuals. However, anyone of any age or level of fitness can follow one of the alternative HIT programmes which involve 15-60 second bursts of high intensity cycling interspersed with 2-4 minute intervals of low intensity cycling. HIT can be delivered on simple spinning bikes that are present in commercial gyms and are affordable for use at home or in the workplace.'

Lack of time is the number one reason that the majority of the adult population do not meet the current physical activity recommendations. SIT and HIT could solve this problem.

Sam Shepherd comments: 'A pilot study currently ongoing in the Sports Centre at the University of Birmingham has also shown that previously sedentary individuals in the age-range of 25-60 also find HIT on spinning bikes much more enjoyable and attractive than endurance training and it has a more positive effect on mood and feelings of well-being. This could imply that HIT is more suitable to achieve sustainable changes in exercise behaviour.'

HIT, therefore, seems to provide the ideal alternative to outdoor running, dangerous cycling trips and long boring endurance cycling sessions in health and fitness gyms. That is why the researchers believe that there will be a great future for HIT for obese and elderly individuals and potentially also for patients with hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Full papers (available on request from authors):

Sprint interval and endurance training are equally effective in increasing muscle microvascular density and eNOS content in sedentary males. Matthew Cocks, Christopher S Shaw, Sam O Shepherd, James Fisher, Aaron M Ranasinghe, Thomas A Barker, Kevin D Tipton, and Anton J Wagenmakers.  Journal of Physiology 591(3), pp 641-656, 1 Feb 2013. http://jp.physoc.org/content/591/3/641.abstract
Sprint interval and traditional endurance training increase net intramuscular triglyceride breakdown and expression of perilipin 2 and 5. Sam O Shepherd, Matthew Cocks, Kevin D Tipton, Aaron M Ranasinghe, Thomas A Barker, Jatin G Burniston, Anton J M Wagenmakers and Christopher S Shaw. Journal of Physiology 591 (3), pp 657-675, 1 Feb 2013. http://jp.physoc.org/content/591/3/657.abstract

Contacts

Professor Anton Wagenmakers, Professor of Exercise Metabolism, Liverpool John Moores University
+44(0) 1519 046 269, +44(0) 7929 999 413, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Matthew Cocks, Lecturer in Muscle Biochemistry, Liverpool John Moores University
+44(0) 7540 191 292, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Sam Shepherd, Lecturer in Sports Nutrition, Liverpool John Moores University
+44(0)7824638296, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

For further information, please do not hesitate to contact us. Also please have your published work sent to us, enabling us to link your work to our section ECSS in the media.

Steffen Neubert
ECSS PR, Marketing & Communications Manager
Phone: +49 221 4982 7640
Fax: +49 221 4982 7650
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The IOC’s Medical Commission, an ECSS affiliated since 2010, has recently worked with an international cast of the world’s leading experts on the creation of a must-have tool for all those involved in assessing and treating athletes with injuries sustained in sport. The new publication, entitled “The IOC Manual of Sports Injuries: An Illustrated Guide to the Management of Injuries in Physical Activity”, is targeted at primary care and A&E physicians, general physical therapists, coaches, nurses and physicians' assistants.


IOC Manual of Sports Injuries - Source: eu.wiley.com

The editor, Roald Bahr, a Professor at the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre and a member of the IOC Medical Commission’s Medical & Science group, explains: “This book is really meant to be a handy, practical tool, for the office or for your bag when accompanying your athletes in training or competition. It is about taking care of your athletes in the best way possible.”

More info: http://www.olympic.org/news/first-ever-ioc-manual-of-sports-injuries/190027

 


For further information and high resolution images, please do not hesitate to contact us. Also please have your published work sent to us, enabling us to link your work to our section ECSS in the media.

Steffen Neubert
ECSS PR, Marketing & Communications Manager
Phone: +49 221 4982 7640
Fax: +49 221 4982 7650
Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.ecss.de